Principles of BioMedical Science (9th Grade)

In the introductory course of the PLTW Biomedical Science program, students explore concepts of biology and medicine to determine factors that led to the death of a fictional person. While investigating the case, students examine autopsy reports, investigate medical history, and explore medical treatments that might have prolonged the person’s life. The activities and projects introduce students to human physiology, basic biology, medicine, and research processes while allowing them to design their own experiments to solve problems.

Medical Terminology (9th Grade)

In Medical Terminology courses, students learn how to identify medical terms by analyzing their components. These courses emphasize defining medical prefixes, root words, suffixes, and abbreviations. The primary focus is on developing both oral and written skills in the language used to communicate within health care professions.

Probability & Statistics (9th Grade)

We are constantly creating hypotheses, making predictions, testing, and analyzing. Our lives are full of probabilities. Statistics is related to probability because much of the data we use when determining probable outcomes comes from our understanding of statistics. We will cover a range of topics, some which include: independent events, dependent probability, combinatorics, hypothesis testing, descriptive statistics, random variables, probability distributions, regression, and inferential statistics.

Emergency Medical Technology (10th Grade)

Emergency Medical Technology courses place a special emphasis on the knowledge and skills needed in medical emergencies. Topics typically include clearing airway obstructions, controlling bleeding, bandaging, methods for lifting and transporting injured persons, simple spinal immobilization, infection control, stabilizing fractures, and responding to cardiac arrest. The courses may also cover the legal and ethical responsibilities involved in dealing with medical emergencies. These courses may prepare students to obtain certification in Emergency Medical Response (EMR), CPR, or First Aid.

Human Body Systems (10th Grade)

Students examine the interactions of human body systems as they explore identity, power, movement, protection, and homeostasis. Exploring science in action, students build organs and tissues on a skeletal Maniken®; use data acquisition software to monitor body functions such as muscle movement, reflex and voluntary action, and respiration; and take on the roles of biomedical professionals to solve real-world medical cases.

AP Biology (10th Grade *Prerequisites Required)

Adhering to the curricula recommended by the College Board and designed to parallel college-level introductory biology courses, AP Biology courses emphasize four general concepts: evolution; cellular processes (energy and communication); genetics and information transfer; and interactions of biological systems. For each concept, these courses emphasize the development of scientific inquiry and reasoning skills, such as designing a plan for collecting data, analyzing data, applying mathematical routines, and connecting concepts in and across domains. AP Biology courses include college-level laboratory investigations.

AP Chemistry (11th Grade *Prerequisites Required)

Following the curricula recommended by the College Board, AP Chemistry courses usually follow high school chemistry and second-year algebra. Concepts covered may include the structure of matter; bonding of intermolecular forces; chemical reactions; kinetics; thermodynamics; and chemical equilibrium. For each concept, these courses emphasize the development of scientific inquiry and reasoning skills, such as designing a plan for collecting data, analyzing data, applying mathematical routines, and connecting concepts in and across domains. AP Chemistry courses include college-level laboratory investigations.

Medical Interventions (11th Grade)

Students follow the life of a fictitious family as they investigate how to prevent, diagnose, and treat disease. Students explore how to detect and fight infection; screen and evaluate the code in human DNA; evaluate cancer treatment options; and prevail when the organs of the body begin to fail. Through real-world cases, students are exposed to a range of interventions related to immunology, surgery, genetics, pharmacology, medical devices, and diagnostics.

AP Seminar (11th Grade)

Designed by the College Board to parallel college-level courses in critical thinking and communications, AP Seminar courses provide students with the opportunity to explore complex real world issues through cross-curricular lenses. Course topics vary and may include local, civic, or global issues and interdisciplinary subject areas. Courses typically emphasize research, communication, and critical-thinking skills to explore the issues addressed. Students may also examine source materials such as articles and other texts; speeches and personal accounts; and relevant artistic and literary works.

Biomedical Innovation (12th Grade)

Biomedical Innovation courses help students apply their knowledge and skills to answer questions or solve problems related to the biomedical sciences. These courses help students design innovative solutions for emerging health challenges and address topics such as clinical medicine, human physiology, medical innovation, water contamination, public health, molecular biology, and forensic autopsy, and public health. These courses may also provide students with the opportunity to work with a mentor or adviser from a university or hospital, physician’s office, or industry. Students may design and complete an independent project as part of the course.

AP Research (12th Grade)

Designed by the College Board to parallel college-level courses in independent research, AP Research courses provide students with the opportunity to conduct an in-depth, mentored research project. Course topics include research methods, ethical research practices, and accessing, analyzing, and synthesizing information to address a research question. Courses culminate with an academic thesis paper and an oral defense of the research design, approach, and findings.