Geology (9th Grade)

This dual-enrollment (HCCC GEO 111) course is designed to give students an understanding of general principles of physical geology and appreciation of the natural world from a scientific perspective. The course focuses on the chemical and physical properties of minerals, the composition of igneous, sedimentary, metamorphic rocks and earth processes responsible for rock and mineral formation. Topics are explored within the general context of plate tectonic theory and include: minerals and rocks, weathering and erosion, geological time, earthquakes, volcanoes, mountain building, landforms, and natural resources. Laboratory work involves the practical application of geological principles such as rock and mineral identification and geological data analysis. Laboratory exercises are designed to increase understanding of course material and to expose students to a variety of tools and topics in geological sciences.

Meteorology (9th Grade)

This dual-enrollment course (HCCC ENV 105) is designed to give the students a comprehensive introduction to the building blocks of atmospheric science to help them develop a basic understanding of why and how atmospheric disturbances occur and their long-lasting consequences.   Topics include atmospheric composition/structure, atmospheric circulation/distribution dynamics, predicting weather and global climate change.  Real time satellite images; videos and other supplementary visual aids compiled by NOAA; National Geographic; USGS; USEPA and other online sources will be integrated into the lectures to breathe life into this subject and to remain current.

Probability & Statistics (9th Grade)

We are constantly creating hypotheses, making predictions, testing, and analyzing. Our lives are full of probabilities. Statistics is related to probability because much of the data we use when determining probable outcomes comes from our understanding of statistics. We will cover a range of topics, some which include: independent events, dependent probability, combinatorics, hypothesis testing, descriptive statistics, random variables, probability distributions, regression, and inferential statistics.

Geospatial Technology (9th Grade)

Geospatial Technology will focus on the spatial analysis of environmental problems by using Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Students will learn the basic skills of ArcGIS and ArcGIS Online. Students will learn how to upload data, create layers, and create maps. Students will be introduced to the various ways to collect data from existing sources and to generate their own data by using GPS units and the Collector App for ArcGIS. The course will culminate in a study of a real world environmental problem where the students will conduct an analysis of the data in ArcGIS to develop solutions and present their findings in StoryMap by ESRI.  Students will receive dual-enrollment credit from Hudson County Community College for this course.

Soil Resources (10th Grade)

In this course, Soil Resources will introduce students to major topics of Fundamentals of Soil Genesis, Classification, Morphology, Fundamentals in Soil, Chemistry & Mineralogy, Fundamentals in Soil Fertility & Nutrient Management, Soil Biology & Soil Ecology, Influences & Management of Soil Physical Properties, and Soil and Land Use Management.

Water Resources (10th Grade)

This Water Resources class introduces the science and policy behind managing our Earth's precious water resources.  Topics include the importance of water to society, hydrologic processes, environmental activities that influence water resources, watershed health based on soil composition, water laws, and pressing water resource issues.  Our goal is to not only gain a water science knowledge base, but to also apply that knowledge to the solving of issues and managing of water resources in an efficient and ethical manner.

Apiculture I & II (10th Grade & 11th Grade)

Apiculture provides an in-depth look at the ecology, biology, and management of the honey bee. Students learn about bee biology, ecology, and management from both lectures and hands-on instruction. Students will establish new colonies, follow their development, and learn to diagnose problems associated with bee culture. Students completing this class should be able to establish and care for a honey bee colony. Students will also learn to prepare honey for market and to manage bees for crop pollination. Inquiry and discussion with apiarists, entomologists, and audio and visual lectures and field trips are sources of additional information. The goal of the class is to gain an understanding of the following: 1) the biology of bees 2) the relationship between bees, plants and people, and 3) the agriculture of honey, pollen, propolis, and wax.

Agriculture and Society I & II (10th Grade & 11th Grade)

Agriculture and Society will focus on learning about the various types of agriculture systems, such as conventional, urban, sustainable, permaculture, and organic. Students will critically analyze human’s impact through agriculture and food production on the environment. Systems thinking will be applied to this course where the students will gain an understanding of the following systems, nutrients and water that are being impacted by agriculture. Students will obtain hands-on experience with the following: hydroponics, aquaponics, and organic gardening.

AP Chemistry (10th Grade *prerequisites required)

Following the curricula recommended by the College Board, AP Chemistry courses usually follow high school chemistry and second-year algebra. Concepts covered may include the structure of matter; bonding of intermolecular forces; chemical reactions; kinetics; thermodynamics; and chemical equilibrium. For each concept, these courses emphasize the development of scientific inquiry and reasoning skills, such as designing a plan for collecting data, analyzing data, applying mathematical routines, and connecting concepts in and across domains. AP Chemistry courses include college-level laboratory investigations.

Urban Ecology (11th Grade)

Urban Ecology will focus on the study of ecology in our built environment. Students will compare and contrast the ecological processes and environmental service systems  in urban, suburban and rural areas. Case studies of various cities will be studied to identify the nature that exist as well as the resiliency of these cities to climate change. Students will conduct lab and field studies in the NY-NJ metro area to enhance their learning in the classroom. Students will receive dual-enrollment credit from Hudson County Community College for this course.

 

Environmental Field & Research I (11th Grade)

Environmental Field & Research I will focus on introducing students to the engineering design process and STEM research. Students will generate research ideas and will learn about the basics of STEM research design, such as conducting background research, proposal writing, statistical and graphical data interpretation, writing a STEM research paper, and presenting a STEM research project. Students will work on STEM research projects on environmental topics, such as water quality, forest field studies, invasive species, climate change, and stormwater management. Students will also be introduced to public policies and regulations that impact environmental service systems. Students will participate in field experiences to enhance their learning in the classroom.

AP Biology (11th Grade *prerequisites required)

Adhering to the curricula recommended by the College Board and designed to parallel college-level introductory biology courses, AP Biology courses emphasize four general concepts: evolution; cellular processes (energy and communication); genetics and information transfer; and interactions of biological systems. For each concept, these courses emphasize the development of scientific inquiry and reasoning skills, such as designing a plan for collecting data, analyzing data, applying mathematical routines, and connecting concepts in and across domains. AP Biology courses include college-level laboratory investigations.

Environmental Public Policy (12th Grade)

This course begins with an overview of present environmental policies as expressed in State and Federal legislation, and proceeds with an examination of both the process and substance of environmental policy. The history of the modern environmental movement and the impact it continues to have on public policy are explored. Topics include: environmental policy formation and implementation; influences of public interest groups, industry, the courts, and the media; issues concerning solid waste management, catastrophic events, and global climate change. The course explores as well the significance of the National Environmental Policy Act, the Endangered Species Act, the Clean Water Act, the Clean Air Act and Right-to-Know laws. Students are expected to participate in information gathering through active research from legislative histories, agency backgrounds, and, where appropriate, attending public hearings.  Students will receive dual-enrollment credit from Hudson County Community College for this course.

Environmental Field & Research II (12th Grade)

Environmental Field & Research II will focus on advancing the students’ skills in developing projects using the  engineering design process and STEM research that were learned in Environmental Field & Research I. Students will work on STEM research projects on various environmental topics, such as air

pollution generated by fossil fuel combustion, biodegradation and bioremediation, biodiversity of the Meadowlands, smart growth, sustainable urban development, and the adaptive reuse of an urban building. Students will conduct a mini-environmental impact statement where they will assess the impacts of proposed building actions on the environment. Students will also be introduced to public policies and regulations that impact environmental service systems. Students will participate in field experiences to enhance their learning in the classroom